Thursday, March 17, 2011

Universal Salvation and being taken seriously

I'd like God to take me seriously.  To take my actions and their consequences as my own acts, freely chosen, and owned by me.  The notion of Universal Salvation strips that seriousness away.  I enjoy our Universalist tradition and heritage, but I think the Humanists trumped it and better recognized the reality and nobility of being human: we live, we act, we die, and only ourselves accountable for our lives. Something God can't do either.

2 comments:

Transient and Permanent said...

Hi Bill. We should also acknowledge that the Universalists and the humanists were not two different parties. The Universalists helped developed humanism in the first place and many of the important 20th century Universalists considered themselves humanists, a label they found in no way dissonant with their identities as Christians. I recommend checking out Clarence Skinner or John Murray Atwood as good examples of this trend.

Bill Baar said...

Thanks, yes, and it's a history that should be studied. I wish I could publish on them the way Boston Unitarian does on that generation of Unitarians.